Why Don’t The Amish Get Cancer?

By Julie Fink
Posted On Apr 26, 2016
Why Don’t The Amish Get Cancer?

A recent study published in the journal of Cancer Causes and Control has revealed that Amish people have virtually no cancer within their population. Why is this?

Is it that the churning butter ritual makes for ripped arms and ups the heart rate?

Can it be that riding in buggies promotes relaxation and a calm mind?

Maybe it’s because the Amish don’t have DVRs backlogged three months waiting to binge-watch the latest societal thrill ride?

I bet they didn’t get hammered over the weekend on happy hour cocktails followed by 2$ wing night and a barrage of shots.

It definitely has something to do with a kitchen free of pop tarts, hot pockets, last night’s Arby’s impulse dinner, Starbucks overload, Stouffer’s three cheese lasagna, and hoards of other fake food.

These are just a few ideas in mind but let’s turn to the experts for the real answers. The study was conducted by researchers from Ohio State University’s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. They originally began studying the Ohio Amish population with the hypothesis that cancer rates would be higher among the Amish because they are closed off from society and they often intermarry.

Their discoveries were shockingly the opposite. Not only are their cancer rates lower but the Amish live a lifestyle that promotes health and well-being.

Researchers believe that these lifestyle factors play an important role in the limited number of cancer cases:

  • amish-farm-cartMost Amish people do not smoke or drink, and they are typically not sexually promiscuous
  • The high amount of physical labor undertaken by the Amish: farming, construction, etc.
  • The Amish grow and raise all their own food
  • They use organic methods that provide them with healthy fruits, vegetables, milk, meat, and other untainted foods that most Americans never get.
  • Their food is rich in living enzymes, vitamins, and nutrients

CONCLUSION

The Amish are lifestyle ninjas. Their food is grown and raised the way it should be, resulting in improved health, their commitment to simple and productive lives has greatly increased their overall well-being, and their discipline and sense of community is something to emulate.

This is a culture steeped deep in tradition, embracing the importance of hard work, family, and religion. Although I may not agree 100% with their ideology, it’s their work ethic that is the source of a cancer free life.

And while some may ridicule their seclusion and reluctance to adopt the many conveniences of modern technology, I’d point out the rest of us sitting in office buildings all day, eating processed and genetically modified junk food, and popping prescription medications while texting, Tweeting, and Snapchatting our lives to oblivion.

This post originally appeared on national nutrition website, Natural News.

Original source: Division of Human Genetics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH